Cruising to Kake, Alaska


Welcome to Kake.

Kake, AlaskaKake is located on the northwest coast of Kupreanof Island along Keku Strait and Frederick Sound, 95 air miles southwest of Juneau. Centrally located in the Southeast panhandle of the State, Kake is a Tlingit village rich in cultural history and tradition. The word Kake comes from the Tlingit word “Keix’,” meaning “opening of daylight.” The region of Kake has been inhabited by the Tlingit people for thousands of years who controlled the trade routes around Kuiu and Kupreonof islands, defending their territory against other tribal groups in the region. Kake is in many ways a traditional Tlingit town, and is home to one of the world’s largest totem poles towering over the village at 132 feet, carved in 1967 for the Alaska Purchase centennial.

Whales watching

Kake is a prime spot for viewing whales. Whales migrate through the Kake area in large numbers. The waters surrounding Kake are rich with halibut and salmon making it a world-class destination for anglers as well as a prime spot for whale watching. Kake also has a large black bear population, with moose, Sitka black-tail deer, wolf, bald eagles, sea otters, and seal thriving in the area. Fishing for salmon and halibut is superb in Kake. Freshwater streams in season are abundant in trout, steelhead, and salmon.

Biking, hiking and kayaking are popular activities, and the annual Kake Dog Salmon Festival can’t be missed. More than 120 miles of logging road head inland from the village and can be explored by mountain bike or on foot to access more of Kupreonof Island. Trail access from the roadway includes Big John Bay Trail, Goose Lake Trail and Cathedral Falls Trail. Bear viewing is possible along Silver Spike Road Bridge and at Gunnuck Creek Hatchery, where a large number of chum salmon return every summer.